A Writer's Ruminations

#December 2006

poetrysince1912:

Pictured: Thelma Wood and Djuna Barnes from Autostraddle’s 150 Years of Lesbians And Other Lady-Loving-Ladies. In the October 1959 issue of Poetry, Marie Ponsot reviews Djuna Barnes’s verse play, The Antiphon: Let me make plain that I find for her [Djuna Barnes] as in others of her generations dazzling gaggle of creative girls—e.g., H.D., Mary Butts, Edith Sitwell, Kay Boyle, Bryher—one radical resemblance: their art runs hard upon the nature of the numinous and draws its power from their transcendant sense of the work of the making artist. Three of them quote at various times and in varied translations, “A poet is a light and winged thing, and holy.” I believe they mean it.Brian Phillips, in the December 2006 issue of the magazine, explains that Barnes’s Nightwood was written “while living with Peggy Guggenheim after the breakup of her relationship with Thelma Wood.”

poetrysince1912:

Pictured: Thelma Wood and Djuna Barnes from Autostraddle’s 150 Years of Lesbians And Other Lady-Loving-Ladies. In the October 1959 issue of Poetry, Marie Ponsot reviews Djuna Barnes’s verse play, The Antiphon:

Let me make plain that I find for her [Djuna Barnes] as in others of her generations dazzling gaggle of creative girls—e.g., H.D., Mary Butts, Edith Sitwell, Kay Boyle, Bryher—one radical resemblance: their art runs hard upon the nature of the numinous and draws its power from their transcendant sense of the work of the making artist. Three of them quote at various times and in varied translations, “A poet is a light and winged thing, and holy.” I believe they mean it.

Brian Phillips, in the December 2006 issue of the magazine, explains that Barnes’s Nightwood was written “while living with Peggy Guggenheim after the breakup of her relationship with Thelma Wood.”